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Mushroom Crepe

A mushroom crêpe stuffed with button, crimini, maitake, oyster and portabella mushrooms. Photo courtesy of MushroomInfo.com. The recipe is on the website.

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ABOUT THE AUTHORs

 

CAITLIN BARRETT is a member of THE NIBBLE editorial staff. She wishes that she could make a joke here about being a “fun guy.”

KAREN HOCHMAN is Editorial Director of THE NIBBLE.

 

 

November 2005
Last Updated May 2013

Product Reviews / Main Nibbles / Vegetables

Mushroom Types For Cooking

Page 4: Mushroom Glossary D To K

This is Page 4 of a six-page article. Click on the black links below to visit other pages. See all of our delicious food glossaries.

Wild & Specialty Mushroom Glossary D To K

My Name Get To Know Me

EGG MUSHROOM

See chanterelle mushroom.

 

ENOKI MUSHROOM

These long and slender mushrooms are almost too pretty to eat. They have a mild flavor, often called fruity, and can be used raw instead of sprouts for crunch in a sandwich; or, toss them into a salad (trim the spongy base) or stir fry. We like to tie them into a bouquet with a chive and use them as a garnish, or float a few delicate mushrooms atop soups. They are cultivated year round. Other names include enokitake, enokidake, nametake, snow puff mushroom, velvet foot mushroom and winter mushroom.

Enoki Mushrooms
Enoki mushrooms. Photo by Kelly Cline | IST.

ERINGI or ERYNGI MUSHROOM

See king eryngi, below.

 

FOREST NAMEKO or CINNAMON CAP MUSHROOM

This handsome, long-stemmed mushroom is great in light soups like miso or wonton soup. They have a firm texture and slight crunch, with mushroomy earthiness. Nameko is often found pickled, for use in sauces and noodle dishes. They are available October through February.

Nameko
Forest nameko mushrooms. Photo courtesy of Gourmet Mushrooms, Inc.

GIROLE MUSHROOM

See chanterelle mushroom.

 

HEDGEHOG or PIED DE MOUTON MUSHROOM

This mushroom gets its name from the small toothlike projections underneath its cap, rather than gills. (Other people see it differently: pied de mouton means sheep’s leg.) It is similar to the chanterelle in color and flavor; the cap is often tawny with a pale stem; the flesh is firm and dense with a very buttery flavor.

Hedgehog Mushroom
Hedgehog mushrooms. Photo courtesy of MarxFoods.com.

HEN OF THE WOODS OR MAITAKE MUSHROOM

The word “maitake” is Japanese for “dancing”; it is rumored that these mushrooms got their name because a discovery of maitake mushrooms was something to dance about. You can see why it is called “hen of the woods” in English. With a flavor that is bold and similar to a portobello, it is excellent baked, braised or sautéed with butter. Not to be confused with chicken of the woods, a different species with a texture similar to chicken.

Maitake Mushroom
Hen of the woods or maitake mushroom. Photo courtesy of Bahasajapen.com.

HORN OF PLENTY MUSHROOM

See trumpet royale mushroom.

 

JAPANESE BLACK MUSHROOM

See shiitake mushroom.

 

KING BOLETES MUSHROOM

See cep mushroom.

 

KING ERYNGI or KING OYSTER or KING TRUMPET MUSHROOM

Now cultivated indoors, this impressive-looking mushroom can grow to four inches in height. It has a firm and meaty texture and a mild and elegant flavor. Its scientific name is Pleurotus eryngii; the mushroom is also known as argonane, boletus of the steppes, bouligoule, cardarello, cardoncello, champignon de garrigue, French horn mushroom, and pleorote du panicaut and trumpet royale.

King Eryngii Mushroom

Photo of organic king trumpet mushrooms by Claire Freierman | THE NIBBLE.

Continue To Page 5: Mushroom Glossary L To P

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